THE LAW OFFICE OF RICHARD WAGNER

19 YEARS EXPERIENCE IN CRIMINAL AND DUI DEFENSE, PROVEN TRACK RECORD, HIGHLY RATED AND REVIEWED CRIMINAL DUI DEFENSE ATTORNEY, FORMER PROSECUTOR.

Federal Criminal Defense Attorney

Federal Criminal Attorney – Orange County, LA, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego

federal criminal attorney

Federal Criminal Defense cases result from investigations by federal law enforcement agency such as the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) or U.S. Department of Homeland Security.

Federal prosecutors from the Department of Justice (DOJ) file an indictment or information in federal district court and federal criminal cases are prosecuted by the United States Attorney’s Office.

Evidence in federal cases may include surveillance video, wiretaps, records, photographs, fingerprint scans, electronic or digital evidence such as computers, and cellphone evidence.

If you have been charged with a federal drug trafficking crime for heroin, marijuana, Oxycodone, crack cocaine, powder cocaine, MDMA or methamphetamine, the FBI or DEA in most cases has an overwhelming amount of evidence against you. As a result, nearly ninety percent of all federal criminal cases involve guilty pleas and many of these cases involve some form of plea agreement.

While you may be charged with a drug trafficking offense carrying a mandatory minimum penalty, The Law Office of Richard Wagner, A Professional Corporation, has negotiated sentences below the mandatory minimum for clients.

The Law Office of Richard Wagner, A Professional Corporation, provides clients with high-quality representation when facing federal sentencing so clients get the most lenient sentence possible. If prison is part of the agreement, Richard Wagner negotiates the best facility possible with release at the earliest opportunity.

Richard Wagner understands the sentencing judge is required to impose a sentence that is “sufficient, but not greater than necessary” to fulfill the purposes of sentencing.

The Federal Sentencing Guidelines went into effect in 1987. Sentencing judges calculate a defendant’s guideline level and criminal history score.

The court is permitted to depart from a guideline-specified sentence when it finds “a mitigating circumstance … not adequately taken into consideration by the Sentencing Commission in formulating the guidelines that should result in a sentence different from that described.”

The sentencing guideline range is only one of seven factors a court must consider before it imposes sentence.

If you have a federal criminal case, contact Strikeforce Federal Attorney Richard Wagner by calling 714-721-4423 for a FREE CONSULTATION.